Welcome to New Hampshire Psychological Association

Public Resources

Psychologists offer useful information to improve many areas of our lives, and these recommendations are based on research findings. When you are looking for written materials to give you a deeper understanding or guidance in coping with an issue, choose a reliable source of information.

How to recognize and deal with anger:

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/recognize-anger.aspx

Managing your distress in the aftermath of a mass shooting:

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/mass-shooting.aspx

How exercise fuels the brain’s stress buffers:

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/exercise-stress.aspx

Making lifestyle changes that last:

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/lifestyle-changes.aspx

Can this marriage be saved?

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2013/04/marriage.aspx

Communication tips for parents:

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/communication-parents.aspx

Why sleep is important and what happens when you don’t get enough:

http://www.apa.org/topics/sleep/why.aspx

Suicide warning signs:

http://www.apa.org/topics/suicide/signs.aspx

Losing weight, but not healthy:

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2014/12/losing-weight.aspx

The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States and is the world’s largest association of psychologists. APA’s membership includes more than 137,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial, and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication, and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives.